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Privacy Talk

  • Mobile Big Data: Solving Real Life Challenges While Maintaining Users’ Privacy & Trust March 18, 2015 Mobile phone data can be used to help solve some of the most pressing public policy needs of our times –from managing traffic in congested and polluted urban environments, to understanding and preventing the spread of diseases. The GSMA hosted an interactive seminar at this year’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, featuring experts from Telefónica, Telenor and Flowminder who discussed how big data can be used to provide practical solutions to real life challenges while respecting mobile users’ privacy. Nuria Oliver, Scientific Director, Telefonica Research talked about how insights from analysing anonymised mobile ‘Call Data Records’ (CDRs) can help institutions and policymakers make better decisions. She described how analysis of the patterns of mobile call activity in one area of Mexico have helped reach a better understanding of the local population’s socio-economic levels and make inferences about their access to education and sanitation. She also referred to the use of sensors on cell towers, which can detect a rise in water level and detect floods after a natural disaster so that decisions can be made about where to send emergency aid, resources etc. Linus Bengtsson, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Flowminder, presented the results of a research study from Africa, where mobile data were used to make predictions about the spread of malaria around Zanzibar. The insights from the data analysis helped the local government better target resources by identifying a ‘likely affected population’ area of 0.19 million people compared to the initial assumptions that 1.29 million people could be affected. Kenth Engø-Monsen, Senior Data Scientist at Telenor Research spoke about new research ...
  • Mobile Privacy: delivering trust for consumers and citizens March 29, 2012 The convergence of mobile and the internet is bringing significant benefits to consumers and society. However, this welcomed development is also re-shaping the online privacy landscape and is leading to the emergence of new privacy challenges across the mobile ecosystem. Traditional approaches to online privacy are often based on compliance, with a patchwork of national and local law where they exist. However, new mobile applications, services and data flows are increasingly global, and geographically bound data privacy laws appear unable to keep pace. A challenge in the mobile ecosystem is to ensure user privacy is respected and protected by those designing and building applications and services. GSMA has been working with representatives from across the mobile ecosystem including device manufacturers, operating system vendors, application developers, and social networking and internet companies under the GSMA Mobile Privacy Initiative to help establish universal guidelines and approaches that address consumer concerns and foster confidence and trust for mobile users. On 27 February 2012, the GSMA also published a set of Privacy Design Guidelines for Mobile Application Development and sought feedback on them from a range of industry stakeholders, regulators and civil society. This aims at providing users with better transparency, choice and control over how apps use their personal information and mobile operators in Europe will implement the guidelines for their own branded applications. “The Privacy Guidelines which are being implemented now are an important first step, but for real change, there needs to be close collaboration between the mobile industry, Internet industry, civil society and regulators,” said Anne Bouverot, Director General of the GSMA. Watch an interview with Pat Walshe, Director ...
  • Mobile Privacy: delivering trust for consumers and citizens March 29, 2012 The convergence of mobile and the internet is bringing significant benefits to consumers and society. However, this welcomed development is also re-shaping the online privacy landscape and is leading to the emergence of new privacy challenges across the mobile ecosystem. Traditional approaches to online privacy are often based on compliance, with a patchwork of national and local law where they exist. However, new mobile applications, services and data flows are increasingly global, and geographically bound data privacy laws appear unable to keep pace. A challenge in the mobile ecosystem is to ensure user privacy is respected and protected by those designing and building applications and services. GSMA has been working with representatives from across the mobile ecosystem including device manufacturers, operating system vendors, application developers, and social networking and internet companies under the GSMA Mobile Privacy Initiative to help establish universal guidelines and approaches that address consumer concerns and foster confidence and trust for mobile users. On 27 February 2012, the GSMA also published a set of Privacy Design Guidelines for Mobile Application Development and sought feedback on them from a range of industry stakeholders, regulators and civil society. This aims at providing users with better transparency, choice and control over how apps use their personal information and mobile operators in Europe will implement the guidelines for their own branded applications. “The Privacy Guidelines which are being implemented now are an important first step, but for real change, there needs to be close collaboration between the mobile industry, Internet industry, civil society and regulators,” said Anne Bouverot, Director General of the GSMA. Watch an interview with Pat Walshe, Director ...
  • GSMA to speak at 2nd Annual European Data Protection and Privacy conference- December 2011 November 17, 2011 Following up from last year’s successful event, the 2011 European Data Protection and Privacy conference is set to be a dinner. Keynote speakers will include: Viviane Reding, VP of the European Commission and Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship; Axel Voss MEP, Rapporteur on the Initiative Report, European Parliament; Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor; Marie-Hélène Boulanger, Head of Data Protection unit, European Commission; and the GSMA’s Director of Privacy, Pat Walshe Time:Tuesday, 6 December 2011 Venue:Management Centre Europe, Brussels Registration:Fee applies www.dataprotection2011.eu
  • September 2011- GSMA research shows mobile users rank privacy as important when using applications and services September 28, 2011 This new privacy research is the first in a series of studies commissioned by the GSMA to help understand the degree to which privacy interests are of concern to mobile users, and how they influence attitudes towards, and use of, mobile internet services and applications. While the research shows that privacy concerns can discourage consumer engagement with mobile internet services, mobile applications and advertising, it also reveals that users greatly value the services and the opportunities they bring. The research highlighted that half of users were concerned about sharing their personal information while using the mobile Internet or mobile applications. Around 81 per cent of mobile users surveyed felt that safeguarding their personal information was very important and 76 per cent said they were very selective about whom they gave their information to. Key areas of user concern, which focused on trust and confidence, were highlighted as behavioural advertising, location-based services (LBS), mobile applications and third-party sharing. Other study findings include: 89 per cent of users think that it is important to know when personal information is being shared by an application and to be able to turn this off or on; 89 per cent think it important to have the option of giving permission for personal information to be used by third parties and 78 per cent are concerned with third parties having access to the location of their mobile without permission; 74 per cent want to be told if their personal information is collected to target them with offers or promotions; and 92 per cent of respondents have concerns when applications collect personal information without ...

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